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International driving licence post Brexit

Jonathan Duke

Jonathan Duke

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Views certainly seem to be as polarised as ever, but calling people sore losers because of their concern over an uncertain future is not going to help depolarise views any more than others spouting exaggerated fears.


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I'll agree with you on that Tom, a sensible observation. We should all look forward with optimism, not just look back in anger or forward in fear.
 
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Gazellio

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I think this needs a bit of a reality check:

The pain from the loss of British tourism would be spread over the entire population of the EU27. The pain from the loss of EU27 tourism would be spread over the UK population only.

A total loss of tourism between the EU27 and UK would hurt individual Brits far harder than individual EU27 citizens.

Now, you might claim that Brits not spending their money in the EU27 would spend it in the UK, and that may well be the case, but matters of tourism between the UK and EU27 are not as simple as "we spend more there than they do here, so they have more to lose".

All academic anyway as I don't suppose there will be much change in tourism levels post Brexit.


Follow my blog: www.au-revoir.eu


I disagree...

Spain without the British? Its suffering already and without British tourism (and home ownership) it would really struggle.

France & Greece would also be hit hard.
 
Amarillo

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I'll agree with you on that Tom, a sensible observation. We should all look forward with optimism, not just look back in anger or forward in fear.
That is not quite what I meant. Fear is just as valid an emotion of an uncertain future as optimism.

£350m per week extra for the NHS is exaggerated optimism; the leaflet cited is exaggerated fear. Neither are particularly helpful in predicting our future outside the EU.


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parrot2

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Somehow I don't think they will stop the tourist trade as they make money out of it
 
Jonathan Duke

Jonathan Duke

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That is not quite what I meant. Fear is just as valid an emotion of an uncertain future as optimism.

£350m per week extra for the NHS is exaggerated optimism; the leaflet cited is exaggerated fear. Neither are particularly helpful in predicting our future outside the EU.


Follow my blog: www.au-revoir.eu

I agree.... Neither exaggerated optimism, nor exaggerated fear is helpful. However, "exaggeration" does seem to "sell papers" and that's why we have both in abundance.

The OP and other commentators, started from a negative standpoint, IMO. I'm just trying trying to balance with the fact, that in-lieu of any actual agreements (at this stage) why concern ourselves with negative "could be" consequences. As you have said above, things are un-likely to change much..... I'm thinking the same.... But I think we need to refrain from the negative..... It's not good for anyone to dwell, nor incite others.
 
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Amarillo

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As you have said above, things are un-likely to change much.....
Today I withdrew 700 Euros from a cash machine at €1.13 per pound. Two years ago today I'd have got €1.27 per pound. My 700 Euros cost me £68.50 more today than it would have cost two years ago - that's a pretty significant change which is, at least in part, attributable to the Brexit vote.

I'm sure there will be plenty of other significant changes to come; some for the better, others for the worse.


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Jonathan Duke

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Today I withdrew 700 Euros from a cash machine at €1.13 per pound. Two years ago today I'd have got €1.27 per pound.

December 2008 - 1 GBP = 1.0229 EUR

There are many macroeconomic factors to forex rates. I agree Brexit has lead to the current devaluation of our pound, but I see that as an advantage not a disadvantage. I certainly only spend disposable income in the eurozone, perhaps 10-15% of annual income, with the balance being spent in the UK. My euro spending, will be the first thing to get chopped, should I start to suffer from economic un-certainty/tightening. So, it is very much in the EU27's interest, to see me (and brits in general) not suffer as a result of a punishment beating, for voting leave.

I know a counter argument is that we buy a lot of goods/ingredients from the EU, so we will also suffer from price inflation due to a weakened pound. However, again, I look for the positives, in that I hope UK production of goods will then be helped out somewhat, and we will look to buy local where possible.

My father, has an apple orchard in County Armagh (Orchard County) and his business suffered from cheap imports from the EU (which came into the country with a high carbon-footprint also.) Yes, the end-consumer won with "potentially" cheaper apples, and big corporations also certainly won (like Fyffes) however the small local producers suffered..... This tide has now turned, and local produce is now back on the shelves, at a premium price. The advantages of the EUs efficient transportation/distribution network still remain, but with a customs levy on imports, this can be mitigated as we desire, once we are back in control of our borders.
 
WelshGas

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I’m not a Financial expert but I cannot see how EU tourists spend in the U.K. benefits the U.K. in total but U.K. tourists spend is spread around all 27 countries.
I can see how our spending in Denmark, Norway, Sweden and Switzerland will benefit those countries as they are NOT in the Eurozone having their own currency. However, spending in the Eurozone must benefit the members in total rather than separately as they share 1 currency, interest rates etc: or is that too simplistic.
 
altvic

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Read this article in a newspaper today; it updates this thread. I have a 'paper licence' but if I have read the article correctly I might not require an IDPermit (?).


Make sure your driving licence will get you to Europe

Motorists who have an old paper permit will need to replace it at a UK post office

Ali Hussain

Sunday January 03 2021, 12.01am, The Sunday Times

Motorists planning to drive in Europe need to get their paperwork in order

Older expat motorists with paper licences rather than the new ones with a photo ID may need to travel back to the UK to get extra paperwork so that they can continue using their cars in Europe.


British passport holders are no longer free to drive within the EU with only their UK licences and may now also need an international driving permit (IDP).


The permits can be obtained at Post Offices for £5.50, but they have to be collected in person, either by the driver or someone on their behalf with a copy of the applicant’s passport.


Although most EU countries do not require an international licence for short stays, they are required for longer visits, affecting those with holiday homes or expats who have not converted their licences to the country they live in.


An IDP is needed in Denmark if you intend to drive there for more than 90 days. In Germany and Spain, you need one if you intend to drive for more than six months.


You will not need an international licence if you have a photo ID licence. Out of 49 million licences, about 5 million are paper versions, according to the Driver and Vehicle Licensing Agency.


The Post Office said: “IDPs can only be obtained in person at a branch, there is currently no option for online or telephone orders.”


You can ask someone to obtain an IDP on your behalf but they will need a passport-size photo of you, and your passport. A photocopy of your passport is not acceptable, so this would only work if you were willing to send your passport to a trusted family member or friend in the UK, who can then go into the branch, buy the IDP and send everything back to Europe.


There are two types of IDP (a 1949 and a 1968) and where you go determines which one you need — so potentially you could need both if you drive in more than one country.

The 1949 IDP is required for Ireland, Malta, Spain or Cyprus and is valid for 12 months. The 1968 version is required in Belgium, Germany and France and lasts for three years.


The latest official data showed that there were 784,900 British citizens living in the EU, excluding the UK and Ireland, in January 2017. The three most popular countries — Spain, France and Germany — accounted for about two thirds of this number.


Motorists will also need to carry a “green card” — an international certificate of insurance guaranteeing that the driver has the necessary minimum level of third-party cover. To get one, contact your insurer. It will send you your green card, normally free of charge, and you need to carry it with you when you travel. You can order one online and print it out. It does not have to be on green paper.


If you are already living in Europe, you will have been able to convert your licence to one from the country of your residence until the end of last year. The French government has extended this until the end of 2021. Before you can make an application you will need to demonstrate at least six months’ residence in France.


Nicholas Lyes from the motoring organisation the RAC said: “It’s important that every driver plans ahead carefully to ensure a trouble-free trip and stays on top of changes as they are announced. Right now, we understand a driver planning a journey needs to contact their motor insurer about getting a green card, and look into trailer registration if they are towing. Drivers should also keep their vehicle log book with them and display a separate GB sticker.”
 
GrumpyGranddad

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For those younger than me. There was a time, I know it may be hard to believe, when the U.K. was a sovereign nation prior to joining the Common Market, as it was then called back in the 1970’s, and I don’t recall any problems driving off the ferry in Calais and down through France.
I toured parts of Europe in the early 70’s with no problems at all. On one trip I visited France, Belgium, Luxembourg, Germany, Austria, Switzerland and Italy. Different currencies - no problem (plan ahead), International driving licence - no problem (issued by the AA), green card - no problem (issued by insurer), No SatNav - no problem (we had maps), No mobile phones - no problem.
 
V

Vagophile

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I toured parts of Europe in the early 70’s with no problems at all. On one trip I visited France, Belgium, Luxembourg, Germany, Austria, Switzerland and Italy. Different currencies - no problem (plan ahead), International driving licence - no problem (issued by the AA), green card - no problem (issued by insurer), No SatNav - no problem (we had maps), No mobile phones - no problem.
Aah! Happy days. Phoning home using a payphone. Offering a Yugoslavian policeman pounds to pay a trumped up fine. Being refused entry to Bulgaria because we didn't have a visa and having to return to Greece where we had overstayed our welcome and then trying to get back in.
 
GrumpyGranddad

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Aah! Happy days. Phoning home using a payphone. Offering a Yugoslavian policeman pounds to pay a trumped up fine. Being refused entry to Bulgaria because we didn't have a visa and having to return to Greece where we had overstayed our welcome and then trying to get back in.
I paid for petrol in Luxembourg on my return journey with a combination of various currencies and some cigarettes - no problem and gave me a story to tell. :)
 
B J G

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Read this article in a newspaper today; it updates this thread. I have a 'paper licence' but if I have read the article correctly I might not require an IDPermit (?).


Make sure your driving licence will get you to Europe

Motorists who have an old paper permit will need to replace it at a UK post office

Ali Hussain

Sunday January 03 2021, 12.01am, The Sunday Times

Motorists planning to drive in Europe need to get their paperwork in order

Older expat motorists with paper licences rather than the new ones with a photo ID may need to travel back to the UK to get extra paperwork so that they can continue using their cars in Europe.


British passport holders are no longer free to drive within the EU with only their UK licences and may now also need an international driving permit (IDP).


The permits can be obtained at Post Offices for £5.50, but they have to be collected in person, either by the driver or someone on their behalf with a copy of the applicant’s passport.


Although most EU countries do not require an international licence for short stays, they are required for longer visits, affecting those with holiday homes or expats who have not converted their licences to the country they live in.


An IDP is needed in Denmark if you intend to drive there for more than 90 days. In Germany and Spain, you need one if you intend to drive for more than six months.


You will not need an international licence if you have a photo ID licence. Out of 49 million licences, about 5 million are paper versions, according to the Driver and Vehicle Licensing Agency.


The Post Office said: “IDPs can only be obtained in person at a branch, there is currently no option for online or telephone orders.”


You can ask someone to obtain an IDP on your behalf but they will need a passport-size photo of you, and your passport. A photocopy of your passport is not acceptable, so this would only work if you were willing to send your passport to a trusted family member or friend in the UK, who can then go into the branch, buy the IDP and send everything back to Europe.


There are two types of IDP (a 1949 and a 1968) and where you go determines which one you need — so potentially you could need both if you drive in more than one country.

The 1949 IDP is required for Ireland, Malta, Spain or Cyprus and is valid for 12 months. The 1968 version is required in Belgium, Germany and France and lasts for three years.


The latest official data showed that there were 784,900 British citizens living in the EU, excluding the UK and Ireland, in January 2017. The three most popular countries — Spain, France and Germany — accounted for about two thirds of this number.


Motorists will also need to carry a “green card” — an international certificate of insurance guaranteeing that the driver has the necessary minimum level of third-party cover. To get one, contact your insurer. It will send you your green card, normally free of charge, and you need to carry it with you when you travel. You can order one online and print it out. It does not have to be on green paper.


If you are already living in Europe, you will have been able to convert your licence to one from the country of your residence until the end of last year. The French government has extended this until the end of 2021. Before you can make an application you will need to demonstrate at least six months’ residence in France.


Nicholas Lyes from the motoring organisation the RAC said: “It’s important that every driver plans ahead carefully to ensure a trouble-free trip and stays on top of changes as they are announced. Right now, we understand a driver planning a journey needs to contact their motor insurer about getting a green card, and look into trailer registration if they are towing. Drivers should also keep their vehicle log book with them and display a separate GB sticker.”
UK Photo ID Drivers Licence recognised by EU. Part of last minute Brexit agreement.
Green Card is required for EU travel.
Trailers - over 750kgs Grosse weight and (I understand) in Commercial use can be registered in UK.
The UK was coming into line with the EU but only went part of the way, doubt if it will in the short term.
Trailers must comply with all legal requirements, lighting, tyres etc.
Vehicle Insurance would need to show that the trailer is covered otherwise independent trailer cover needed. Many just assume this is included- check if towing in EU.
 
W

Wongo

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I disagree...

Spain without the British? Its suffering already and without British tourism (and home ownership) it would really struggle.

France & Greece would also be hit hard.
28 billion lost to UK economy if EU tourism dries up
 
Ocean Spirit

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I have a magnetic GB badge but would prefer just that people in Europe would maintain the ability to recognise a UK number plate format (private miss -spaced numbers and letters excepted). I still have the euro style with the emblem and quite like how they look. Really not fussed though as long as insurance companies don't start trying to fleece us for inflated admin cost claims.
 

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